503-123-1234
Call Our Office: 503-554-0036

Staying Safe and Immunizations

What Parents Need to Know About Influenza

Influenza (also known as the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and lungs. Influenza is different from a cold, and often comes on suddenly. Here are some links to information about the flu and young children:

Influenza Symptoms

Flu symptoms can include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Body aches
  • Headache
  • Chills
  • Fatigue
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea (more common in children than adults)

Protect Your Family Against Influenza

The best way to protect against Influenza is to get a yearly flu vaccine for yourself and your child. Flu vaccination is recommended for everyone 6 months and older every year. Flu shots and nasal spray flu vaccines are both options for vaccination.

In addition to vaccination, you and your child should take everyday actions to help prevent the spread of the flu including:

  • Stay away from people who are sick as much as possible to keep from getting sick yourself
  • If you or your child are sick, avoid others as much as possible when you or your child are sick to keep from infecting them
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes
  • Wash your hands often
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth
  • Clean surfaces or objects that may be contaminated with flu viruses

Call: 503-554-0036

Phones are answered and office is open 8:30 am - 5:00 pm  Monday-Friday.

After Hours:  For urgent medical needs after-hours, please call the office at 503-554-0036 and follow the prompts to be connected to our Physicians Answering Service. Voicemail messages left after-hours at that number will be returned early the next business day.

What Parents Need to Know About Coronavirus (COVID-19)

We’re happy to answer your questions about COVID-19 infection. Here’s a list of reliable sources to stay updated:

Some Reassurance

“Based on what we know, children have experienced a mild form of the disease and some have been hospitalized,” said Ann-Christine Nyquist, MD, FAAP, a member of the AAP Committee on Infectious Diseases. With many questions remaining about the virus, she urged pediatricians and their patients to seek information only from trusted sources — the AAP, the CDC, and local and state health departments.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), an organization of 67,000 pediatricians dedicated to the health of all kids, is closely monitoring children’s response to the virus.

COVID-19 Symptoms

COVID-19, like other human coronaviruses, has symptoms similar to the common cold or flu. Some people experience mild illness while others become very sick. So far, children seem to tolerate the illness better than adults and most people who have tested positive for the virus have recovered.

Symptoms typically appear within 14 days of exposure and include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Body aches
  • Tiredness
  • Sore throat
  • Headache
  • Diarrhea
  • Pneumonia

 

Protect Your Family

We know the COVID-19 is spread from person to person, like a cold, through droplets in the air from coughs and sneezes. It is not as contagious as measles,
which is a relief, but avoiding exposure is key. Recommendations for staying well:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, about the time it takes to hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • If you cannot wash your hands, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick or becoming sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue (not your hands) and throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Get a COVID-19 vaccine and boosters as appropriate. Get a flu shot each year.

Call: 503-554-0036

Phones are answered and office is open 8:30 am - 5:00 pm  Monday-Friday.

After Hours:  For urgent medical needs after-hours, please call the office at 503-554-0036 and follow the prompts to be connected to our Physicians Answering Service. Voicemail messages left after-hours at that number will be returned early the next business day.

What Parents Need to Know About RSV

RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus, is a common but contagious respiratory virus that usually causes mild, cold-like symptoms. Although most older children and adults recover in a week or two, RSV can be serious, especially for infants and young children. Here are some links to information about RSV in infants and young children:

Protect your child from RSV

RSV Symptoms

Although RSV may be mild when it first starts, it can become increasingly severe a few days into
the illness. Early symptoms of RSV may include:

  • Runny nose
  • Decreased appetite
  • Cough, which may progress to wheezing or difficulty breathing

Infants with RSV almost always show symptoms, though in very young infants (less than 6 months old) the only symptoms of RSV infection may be:

  • Irritability
  • Decreased activity
  • Decreased appetite
  • Apnea (pauses in breathing for more than 10 seconds)
  • A fever may not always occur with RSV infections

Prevent the Spread of RSV

RSV season in Oregon usually starts in the fall and peaks in the winter. To protect infants and
young children from RSV, you should take extra care by doing the following:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • If you cannot wash your hands, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least
    60% alcohol
  • Keep your hands away from your face to avoid spreading germs
  • Avoid close contact with sick people
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes
  • Clean and disinfect highly-used surfaces and objects

Call: 503-554-0036

Phones are answered and office is open 8:30 am - 5:00 pm  Monday-Friday.

After Hours:  For urgent medical needs after-hours, please call the office at 503-554-0036 and follow the prompts to be connected to our Physicians Answering Service. Voicemail messages left after-hours at that number will be returned early the next business day.

503-554-0036